Health Guide USA
America's Online Health Resource Guide

Audiologists | What Do They Do?

Audiologists typically do the following:

  • Examine patients who have hearing, balance, or related ear problems
  • Assess the results of the examination and diagnose problems
  • Determine and administer treatment
  • Fit and dispense hearing aids
  • Counsel patients and their families on ways to listen and communicate, such as by lip reading or through sign language
  • See patients regularly to check on hearing and balance and to continue or change the treatment plan
  • Keep records on the progress of patients
  • Conduct research related to the causes and treatment of hearing and balance disorder




Audiologists use audiometers, computers, and other devices to test patients' hearing ability and balance, determine the extent of hearing damage, and identify the underlying cause. Audiologists measure the volume at which a person begins to hear sounds and the person's ability to distinguish between sounds. Also, before determining treatment options, they evaluate psychological information to measure the impact of hearing loss on a patient. Treatment options vary and may include cleaning wax out of ear canals, fitting and checking hearing aids, or fitting and programming the patient with cochlear implants to improve hearing. (Cochlear implants are tiny devices that are placed under the skin near the ear in an operation. Cochlear implants deliver electrical impulses directly to the auditory nerve in the brain so a person with certain types of deafness can hear.)  Audiologists also counsel patients on other ways to cope with profound hearing loss, such as by learning to lip read or use American Sign Language. 

Some audiologists specialize in working with the elderly or with children. Others design products to help protect the hearing of workers on the job. Audiologists who are self-employed build a client base, hire employees, keep records, order equipment and supplies, and do other tasks related to running a business.

Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook Handbook, 2012-13 Edition


for State specific information, visit  JOB OUTLOOK BY STATE






Assessor Links USA    All Things Political

Juggling Cats    Doomsday Guide

Health Resource USA    Innovators Guide     Active Canines


To report a broken link or to suggest a new site for
our online resource guide, please Contact Us.

Proquantum Corporation.
Copyright @ 2002-2017

Use of this website is expressly subject to the various
terms and conditions set forth in our

User Agreement/Disclaimer  and Privacy Policy